Stock For Mac 10

The Ingram MAC-10 (M10) was a short-lived, compact submachine gun initiative seeing limited production and equally-limited action across the globe. While introducing some impressive and interesting concepts, the weapon system failed to materialize as a serious contender within the established submachine market and was soon overtaken by other factor out of her control. The weapon system was not helped by the American military's decision to pass on full production orders and her future was ultimately decided for her with the collapse of her host company, Military Armament Corporation (MAC - hence the 'MAC-10' designation). Despite the widely-accepted designation of 'MAC-10', the submachine gun was officially marketed as the 'M10' and the former identifier was never used in any official capacity. However, it has since become universally accepted as the 'MAC-10' and nothing more.
MAC-10 Origins
Design of the MAC-10 began as early as 1964 by Gordon B. Ingram. Ingram was a former associate at the Police Ordnance Corporation before leaving to develop the MAC-10. He partnered with Mitchell Werbell III, a former OSS and CIA operative and founder of SIONICS (Studies In the Operational Negation of Insurgents and Counter-Subversion) - a firm centering on the development and sales of firearm-capable suppressors and silencers and their partnership produced the Military Armament Corporation (MAC). Their joint venture and flagship product was to become the MAC-10 with the ultimate hope being quantitative sales to the US military during the ongoing Vietnam War.
To the casual observer, the MAC-10 showcased a design not unlike the Israeli-made UZI series (as well as other submachine guns that have mimicked this general design layout). The submachine gun was characterized by a rectangular receiver fitting a simple straight pistol grip that doubled as the magazine feed. There was a rounded-rectangle trigger ring ahead of the pistol grip and below the forward portion of the receiver. The safety catch was set to the right of the trigger guard. Construction was of steel stampings and the bolt was of a wrap-around - or telescoping - design, essentially 'wrapping around' the barrel and allowing the MAC-10 to achieve such a short receiver length and thus remain a compact weapon system. These design elements made for a steady gun platform, concentrating the firing action balance just over the pistol grip. The cocking handle was situated along the stop of the receiver and accessible by either hand. Interestingly, there was a notch cut through the handle to ensure an unfettered line-of-sight between the operator, the weapon and his target. The cocking handle also doubled as a safety for it could be turned in a 90-degree action to lock the bolt and serve as a visual indicator that the weapon was made safe and unready to fire. The firing action was accomplished through an open bolt, blow-back operated design. A rather large ejection port opening was fitted along the right side of the receiver, corresponding to the placement of the magazine beneath it. A short sling could be attached to a hook at the front panel of the receiver.
  1. Mac 10 Wire Stock For Sale
  2. Mac 10 Stock For Sale
  3. Folding Stock For Mac 10
  4. Folding Stock For Mac 10
  5. Mac 10 Folding Stock

Discover historical prices for MAC stock on Yahoo Finance. View daily, weekly or monthly format back to when Macerich Company (The) stock was issued. Download StockSpy Realtime Stocks Quote for macOS 10.7 or later and enjoy it on your Mac. ‎NEW VERSION - Now with cloud sync between iPhone, iPad, Mac & More! NOTE: Cloud sync with StockSpy apps on other platforms and stores (including iOS) requires a separate purchase for each platform.

Stock For Mac 10

Mac 10 Wire Stock For Sale

Add stock information to your spreadsheet

  1. Tap or click the cell you want to add stock information to.1
    • On your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, tap Cell > Stock Quote. You might need to swipe up to see it.
    • On your Mac, click the Insert button , then choose Stock Quote.
  2. Choose a stock in the list. If you want to search for a specific stock, enter the company name or stock symbol.
  3. Choose the attribute you want to track.
    • On your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, tap the attribute you want to track in this cell. The attribute you’re tracking has a to the left of it. Tap Done.
    • On your Mac, in the Attribute pop-up menu, choose what information you want to track in this cell. Click outside the dialog.

If you want to see updated information as of the previous day's close or change the attribute you're tracking, double-tap or double-click on the cell.

Stock for mac 10

You can also use the STOCK formula to enter and edit stock information in a cell. Here's how to edit the STOCK as a formula:

  • On your iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch, tap on the cell, tap Cell, then tap Edit Formula.
  • On your Mac, double-click on the cell, then click Edit as Formula.

1You must be connected to the Internet to add stock information. If Stock Quote is dimmed, the Internet might be unavailable. Check your network connection. When you're offline, any cell that actively pulls information from the Internet is empty.

Stock attributes that you can track

When you edit the STOCK formula, you can use any of these strings or numbers to show different pieces of data:

  • “price” (0 or omitted): The share price of the specified stock at the market close of the previous market day.
  • “name” (1): The full name of the stock or company.
  • “change” (2): The difference between the last trade on the previous market day and the closing price on the market day prior to that. If the stock hasn’t traded in that interval, the change reported is “0.”
  • “percent change” (3): The percentage change in the stock’s two most recent closing prices.
  • “open” (4): The starting price at which the stock traded at the opening of trading on the previous market day.
  • “high” (5): The highest price at which the stock traded during the previous market day.
  • “low” (6): The lowest price at which the stock traded during the previous market day.
  • “market cap” (7): The total market value of all the outstanding shares of the stock on the previous market day. This is calculated as the total number of outstanding shares multiplied by the price per share.
  • “volume” (8): The number of shares of the stock that changed hands during the previous market day.
  • “yield” (9): The ratio of the stock’s annual dividend (cash payout) per share as a percentage of the share price.
  • “1-year target” (10): The one-year target price estimate, which is the median target price as forecast by analysts covering the stock.
  • “52-week high” (11): The stock’s highest trade price in the last 52 weeks.
  • “52-week low” (12): The stock’s lowest trade price in the last 52 weeks.
  • “avg. 3-month volume” (15): The monthly average of the cumulative trading volume during the last 3 months divided by 22 days.
  • “beta” (16): The measure of the volatility (systematic risk) of a security or commodity in comparison to the market as a whole.
  • “currency” (19): The currency in which the stock is priced.
  • “annual dividend” (20): The yearly dividend (cash payout) amount per share.
  • “eps” (21): Earnings per share—calculated as a company’s total earnings divided by the number of outstanding shares (the stock currently held by all its shareholders).
  • “exchange” (22): The stock exchange on which the stock is traded (for example, NYSE, NASDAQ, Euronext, and so on).
  • “p/e ratio” (23): The price/earnings ratio, calculated by dividing the stock’s current market price by the trailing 12-month earnings per share.
  • “previous close” (24): The stock’s closing price for the trading day prior to the last trade reported.
  • “symbol” (25): The stock symbol (ticker symbol) that uniquely identifies the stock.

Track stock history

If you want to track the history of a specific stock, use STOCKH. When you add the formula, you must define these attributes:

  • Symbol: An abbreviation that uniquely identifies publicly traded shares of a stock on a particular stock market, enclosed in quotes, or a reference to a cell that contains the symbol.
  • Attribute: An optional value specifying the stock attribute to be returned. Numbers automatically suggests 'close.' Instead of close, you can choose open, high, low, or volume.
  • Date: The date for which you want the historical stock price information

Add currency exchange rates to your spreadsheet

Mac 10 Stock For Sale

You can use the CURRENCY formula to pull data about currency exchange rates from the Internet and use them in your spreadsheet. When you add the formula, you must define these attributes:

  • Currency-1: This is the currency code for the currency from which you’re converting. Use quotes around your string.
  • Currency-2: This is the currency code for the currency to which you’re converting. Use quotes around your string.

For your third attribute, Numbers automatically suggests “price.' If you enter 0 or omit this item entirely, the cell shows the exchange rate of currency-1 to currency-2, expressed as currency-2.

Currency attributes that you can track

Folding Stock For Mac 10

Stock For Mac 10

When you edit the formula, you can use any of these strings or numbers to show different pieces of data:

Folding Stock For Mac 10

  • “name” (1): The currency codes of the specified currencies, shown in the formula for calculating the exchange rate.
  • “change” (2): The difference in the exchange rate at the close of trading on the two most recent business days.
  • “percent change” (3): The percentage change in the exchange rate’s two most recent closing prices.
  • “open” (4): The exchange rate at the opening of trading on the previous business day.
  • “high” (5): The highest exchange rate on the previous business day.
  • “low” (6): The lowest exchange rate on the previous business day.
  • “52-week high” (7): The highest exchange rate in the last 52 weeks.
  • “52-week low” (8): The lowest exchange rate in the last 52 weeks.

Track currency history

Mac 10 Folding Stock

If you want to track the history of a specific currency, use CURRENCYH. When you add the formula, you must define these attributes:

  • Currency-1: The currency code for the currency from which you’re converting. currency‑1 is a string enclosed in quotes.
  • Currency-2: The currency code for the currency to which you’re converting. currency‑2 is a string enclosed in quotes.
  • Attribute: An optional value specifying the currency attribute to be returned. Numbers automatically suggests 'close.' Instead of close, you can choose open, high, low, or any other currency attribute (see Currency attributes that you can track).
  • Date: The date for which you want the historical exchange rate information.