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Customer support for Microsoft System Center 2012 Configuration Manager Service Pack 1 (SP1) and System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection SP1 clients differs among the various Macintosh and Linux/UNIX operating systems. This article describes this support to help customers be aware of the differences and also of the effort to standardize the support for both clients.

Original product version: Microsoft System Center 2012 Configuration Manager, System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection
Original KB number: 2798547

For the most recent information, refer to Supported Configurations for Configuration Manager.

The following information describes the supported versions of System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1 and System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection SP1 running on various Macintosh and Linux/UNIX operating systems.

System Center 2012 Configuration Manager SP1

For Mac-based clients

Note

The client for the Macintosh operating systems is supported only on Mac computers that use an Intel 64-bit chipset.

Operating

The following operating systems are supported for the Configuration Manager client for Mac computers:

  • macOS X 10.7 (Lion)
  • macOS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard)

For Linux/UNIX-based clients

The following operating systems are supported for the Configuration Manager client for Linux/UNIX-based computers:

  • Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)
    • Version 6 (x86 and x64)
    • Version 5 (x86 and x64)
    • Version 4 (x86 and x64)
  • Solaris
    • Version 10 (x86 and SPARC)
    • Version 9 (SPARC)
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES)
    • Version 11 (x64 and x86)
    • Version 10 SP1 (x64 and x86)
    • Version 9 (x86)
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For more information, see Supported Configurations for Configuration Manager.

System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection SP1

For Mac-based clients

Note

The client for the Macintosh operating systems is supported only on Mac computers that use an Intel 64-bit chipset.

The following operating systems are supported for System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection SP1 clients for Mac computers:

  • macOS X 10.8 (Mountain Lion)
  • macOS X 10.7 (Lion)
  • macOS X 10.6 (Snow Leopard)

For Linux/UNIX-based clients

The following operating systems are supported for System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection SP1 clients for Linux/UNIX-based computer:

  • RedHat Enterprise Linux (RHEL): versions 6, 5, and 4 (x64 and x86)
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise Server (SLES): versions 11, 10, and 9 (x64 and x86)
  • CentOS: versions 6 and 5
  • Debian: versions 6 and 5
  • Ubuntu: versions 12.04 and 10.04
  • Oracle Linux: versions 6 and 5
The following article is a guide to installing Linux on a Mac PC. Most of the time we opt for Linux operating systems but are confused about the hardware requirements. The tutorial will help you run Linux system on your Mac which will completely replace the original OS. Read on below to find out:

Before you begin, you’ll first need to select the distribution you want to work on. Whichever you choose will determine the kind of working environment you want. Some of them include:

  • Ubuntu: One of the most popular operating systems built on Unity. It is great for new users and offers a very similar environment as macOS does.
  • LinuxMint: Released in 2006, this type is more Window- like and comes in with a range of desktops (Cinnamon, Mate etc.) for Users.
  • Debian: This is perfect for people working on the server side. Although, Debian is a little complicated to set up and use, but offers a lot more features than Ubuntu and Mint.
  • Fedora Linux: This distro is based on various packages such as DNF, RPM and GNOME. It is not recommended for beginners because of the complex working environment.

Try to get familiar with the distribution you want to install so you don’t have any issues later. We recommend starting with Ubuntu since it is the most used and offers plenty of community support in case if you get stuck somewhere.

Installing Linux on a Mac

Yes, there is an option to run Linux temporarily on a Mac through the virtual box but if you’re looking for a permanent solution, you might want to completely replace the present operating system with a Linux distro.

System

To install Linux on a Mac, you’ll need a formatted USB drive with storage up to 8GB. Remember this process will wipe out your current macOS/OS X installation and there is probably a very hard chance to recover it back. Also, don’t try to run macOS and Linux on dual boot because that won’t work too.

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Follow the steps for installation below:

  1. Download Ubuntu or any other Linux distro you want to the Mac. Save it in your Downloads folder.
  2. Now download and install Etcher, an app that will help copy the Linux installation file to your USB drive. (https://www.balena.io/etcher/)
  3. Open the app and click on the Settings icon. Tick on the Unsafe Mode and click on Yes, Continue.
  4. Now Click on SelectImage. Choose the name of the .iso file you downloaded in Step 1.
  5. Insert your USB Drive
  6. Under the SelectDrive option, Click Change. Pick the drive option that matches with your USB drive in size. If you have inserted one drive in your Mac, the option will show /dev/disk1. If there are two drives attached, there will be an option for /dev/disk2 and so on. Note that /dev/disk0 is your Mac’s hard drive. Do not select that option.
  7. Now click Flash to start copying.
  8. Remove the USB Flash Drive and Shut down your Mac.
  9. Now attach the USB drive on the Mac again or to any other PC you want to install it to.
  10. Power up the PC while constantly holding the Option key
  11. From the start up screen, select the EFI Boot Option
  12. You will see a screen with Ubuntu Installation Options that will ask you to either Try Ubuntu or Install Ubuntu. Press the letter ‘e’ to go the boot entry.
  13. Here, you will have to edit the boot entry. Change the line starting with Linux and add the word ‘nomodeset’ after ‘quiet splash’. It should be like this:
  14. Now, Press F10
  15. Ubuntu will start booting into trial mode
  16. Click on the option, ‘Install Ubuntu’
  17. Select your Language and Continue
  18. Now, select the option ‘Install this third party software’ and click continue
  19. Click Yes to the alert option for /dev/sdb
  20. Now select ‘Erase Disk and Install Ubuntu’ and click on continue
  21. Make sure you select the main hard drive and click on Install Now.
  22. Select your location and then click on continue
  23. Choose your keyboard layout and click on Continue
  24. Add a name and Password that you want to use
  25. Click on Continue and your Linux Distro will start installing
  26. Once the installation is finished, you will be asked to restart your Mac
  27. Now, login with your name and password to start using Ubuntu.

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Note: During the installation process, we used the entire hard disk for Ubuntu in step 20, which means your MacOS will be permanently deleted. If you want to keep the MacOS, you will have to make disk partitions, a small 8GB partition and a larger 1000GB for Linux. You can also go to Disk Utility to create proper partitions before you start installing Linux. Have a look here (https://linuxnewbieguide.org/how-to-install-linux-on-a-macintosh-computer/)