Linux Environment For Mac

Are you looking for Linux distributions that give look like popular Apple’s macOS? Then here is the list to go through…

Although it is impossible to get exactly all features just like macOS in Linux because it is a proprietary one, however, we could install one in open source which at least gives feel like it.

Linux (/ ˈ l i n ʊ k s / LEEN-uuks or / ˈ l ɪ n ʊ k s / LIN-uuks) is a family of open source Unix-like operating systems based on the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released on September 17, 1991, by Linus Torvalds. Linux is typically packaged in a Linux distribution. Distributions include the Linux kernel and supporting system software and libraries, many of which are. Transitioning between Mac and Windows. Check out our guide to transitioning between between a Mac and Windows (or Windows Subsystem for Linux) development environment. It can help you map the difference between: Keyboard shortcuts; Trackpad shortcuts; Terminal and shell tools; Apps and utilities. I have experimented a LOT with setting up linux on my Macbook. I have spend months on it. First thing is that it is not worth it if you are not seriously pissed by OSX. This is something that I never thought I would say, but OSX is much better on. Installing Linux on a Mac Yes, there is an option to run Linux temporarily on a Mac through the virtual box but if you’re looking for a permanent solution, you might want to completely replace the present operating system with a Linux distro. To install Linux on a Mac, you’ll need a formatted USB drive with storage up to 8GB.

The reason behind the infatuation of macOS is the graphic elements and transitions offered by it. And this is the reason why often people around the world trying to install skin or some third party Mac OS X Transformation packages to even make Windows looks alike mac.

Another is the reasons for all this is to experience the dock and since the Apple products are costly thus, everybody couldn’t afford them.

Indeed, the Hackintosh like methods are available online to install and use macOS but they are full of technical complications and incompatibility to our exiting PCs. Therefore, why not use the Linux with all its open source independence while having the MacBook like UI.

Moreover, with Linux customization scope is limitless, we can make our Debian or Ubuntu look like macOS with the help of Macubuntu transformation pack.

List of Linux distros resembles Apple’s macOS

List of Linux distros resembles Apple’s macOS

Before starting this list of open source operating systems look similar to macOS, one thing needs to know, this internal working and other features will be remain of Linux.

Deepin- Nice Linux alternative for macOS

Well, Deepin is Ubuntu base opensource operating system that is popular because of its desktop environment and apps which gives not only macOS even Windows users a quite familiar feeling. However, earlier being a Chinese company & developer of this Linux OS, few people quite sceptical in terms of data privacy, however, that has been cleared by its team that there is nothing unethical happing in Deepin.

Deepin Linux’s macOS look like desktop environment

The DDE (Deepoin desktop environment) offers both dock or Windows 7 like start menu along with notification panel. Even the icons are quite eye-catching.

Mac

Best Linux Distro For Mac

Also, all the day to day needed apps come pre-installed in Deepin, moreover, its App store has lots of useful apps ready to download on just one click. Yes, the issue I face while using it on my laptop was the wifi signal issues. Otherwise, it was smooth and easy to handle.

Get Deepin Linux

Elementary OS with macOS like UI

If you are looking for a distribution that will take you as far as possible away from the image of a nerdy hacker type driving around a terminal interface, then Elementary OS is exactly what you need. It’s probably one of the most attractive distribution, with a style similar to macOS. The excellent desktop environment of this operating system is called Pantheon and is based on Gnome.

The latest version of Elementary OS also has its own application installation user interface called AppCenter. It’s a wonderfully easy way to install apps outside of the terminal, which is handy since not many are preinstalled.


However, it comes with the Epiphany browser, the Geary email client, and some basic “tool apps”. You may need to add more programs. However, this is with the integrated AppCenter, which contains chargeable programs that have been specially developed for the operating system, e.g. Quilter for aspiring authors or spice-up to create presentations, easily possible.

Backslashlinux

BackSlashLinux is another Linux distro like mac but not that much popular in comparison to above two, however, still, the developers of this Linux distro have done a splendid job to depict macOS.

It is developed by an India software developer team and based on Debian. Backslashlinux comes with icons and dock resemble macOS one. It is one of the Linux distros with closes MacOS look.

In the above screenshot, we can see the icons of Backslashlinux exactly similar to MAC.

Zorin os

Zorin OS is based on Ubuntu and was developed for Linux beginners, so it should be particularly easy to use. Special attention was therefore paid to a clear user interface. The user interface can be adapted with just a few clicks so that it is similar to that of Windows 10 and macOS. The Windows emulators Wine and PlayOnLinux are preinstalled so that many Windows applications can also be run on Zorin OS.

In the above screenshot, we can see Zorin OS Linux doesn’t offer exactly the same user interface like macOS but a touch of it. It offers a dock which can be adjusted to different positions as per the user requirement. Thus, at least give it a try if you are a beginner to Linux.


There are several variants of Zorin OS:
  • Zorin OS Core: the standard system; free of charge
  • Zorin OS Lite: software selection somewhat reduced; free of charge
  • Zorin OS Educational: software selection especially for educational institutions; free of charge
  • Zorin OS Educational Lite: software selection especially for educational institutions, but somewhat reduced compared to the educational variant; free of charge
  • Zorin OS Ultimate: pre-installed best Business and Media apps; macOS, Windows, Linux & Touch desktop layouts; Over 20 games included; chargeable ($39)

Other Linux distros:

The following article is a guide to installing Linux on a Mac PC. Most of the time we opt for Linux operating systems but are confused about the hardware requirements. The tutorial will help you run Linux system on your Mac which will completely replace the original OS. Read on below to find out:

Before you begin, you’ll first need to select the distribution you want to work on. Whichever you choose will determine the kind of working environment you want. Some of them include:

  • Ubuntu: One of the most popular operating systems built on Unity. It is great for new users and offers a very similar environment as macOS does.
  • LinuxMint: Released in 2006, this type is more Window- like and comes in with a range of desktops (Cinnamon, Mate etc.) for Users.
  • Debian: This is perfect for people working on the server side. Although, Debian is a little complicated to set up and use, but offers a lot more features than Ubuntu and Mint.
  • Fedora Linux: This distro is based on various packages such as DNF, RPM and GNOME. It is not recommended for beginners because of the complex working environment.

Try to get familiar with the distribution you want to install so you don’t have any issues later. We recommend starting with Ubuntu since it is the most used and offers plenty of community support in case if you get stuck somewhere.

Installing Linux on a Mac

Yes, there is an option to run Linux temporarily on a Mac through the virtual box but if you’re looking for a permanent solution, you might want to completely replace the present operating system with a Linux distro.

To install Linux on a Mac, you’ll need a formatted USB drive with storage up to 8GB. Remember this process will wipe out your current macOS/OS X installation and there is probably a very hard chance to recover it back. Also, don’t try to run macOS and Linux on dual boot because that won’t work too.

Follow the steps for installation below:

  1. Download Ubuntu or any other Linux distro you want to the Mac. Save it in your Downloads folder.
  2. Now download and install Etcher, an app that will help copy the Linux installation file to your USB drive. (https://www.balena.io/etcher/)
  3. Open the app and click on the Settings icon. Tick on the Unsafe Mode and click on Yes, Continue.
  4. Now Click on SelectImage. Choose the name of the .iso file you downloaded in Step 1.
  5. Insert your USB Drive
  6. Under the SelectDrive option, Click Change. Pick the drive option that matches with your USB drive in size. If you have inserted one drive in your Mac, the option will show /dev/disk1. If there are two drives attached, there will be an option for /dev/disk2 and so on. Note that /dev/disk0 is your Mac’s hard drive. Do not select that option.
  7. Now click Flash to start copying.
  8. Remove the USB Flash Drive and Shut down your Mac.
  9. Now attach the USB drive on the Mac again or to any other PC you want to install it to.
  10. Power up the PC while constantly holding the Option key
  11. From the start up screen, select the EFI Boot Option
  12. You will see a screen with Ubuntu Installation Options that will ask you to either Try Ubuntu or Install Ubuntu. Press the letter ‘e’ to go the boot entry.
  13. Here, you will have to edit the boot entry. Change the line starting with Linux and add the word ‘nomodeset’ after ‘quiet splash’. It should be like this:
  14. Now, Press F10
  15. Ubuntu will start booting into trial mode
  16. Click on the option, ‘Install Ubuntu’
  17. Select your Language and Continue
  18. Now, select the option ‘Install this third party software’ and click continue
  19. Click Yes to the alert option for /dev/sdb
  20. Now select ‘Erase Disk and Install Ubuntu’ and click on continue
  21. Make sure you select the main hard drive and click on Install Now.
  22. Select your location and then click on continue
  23. Choose your keyboard layout and click on Continue
  24. Add a name and Password that you want to use
  25. Click on Continue and your Linux Distro will start installing
  26. Once the installation is finished, you will be asked to restart your Mac
  27. Now, login with your name and password to start using Ubuntu.

Linux Environment For Mac Installer

Note: During the installation process, we used the entire hard disk for Ubuntu in step 20, which means your MacOS will be permanently deleted. If you want to keep the MacOS, you will have to make disk partitions, a small 8GB partition and a larger 1000GB for Linux. You can also go to Disk Utility to create proper partitions before you start installing Linux. Have a look here (https://linuxnewbieguide.org/how-to-install-linux-on-a-macintosh-computer/)